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Can you help?

Save 10 Murray is made up of hundreds of people from different walks of life, some Tasmanian, some not; all with a common appreciation for the iconic State Government Offices building, the cause of modern heritage and, in many cases, a desire to protect the cultural assets of the city of Hobart.

Many other supporters feel most strongly about the environmental ramifications of demolishing a sound and still useful building, when retrofitting is a viable alternative (as evidenced by the approach of one of the three short-listed designs in the original tender process).

If you support the cause and feel you can help in any way, whether financially or not, please contact “save10murray@gmail.com” for more information. For instance, you might like to buy a T-shirt, a badge…or even a papercraft model of 10 Murray Street, as featured in this review in Architecture Australia.

This is a grassroots campaign without the backing of any large organisation and your support is vital if the effort is to be continued.

Office building backers vow to fight on

The Mercury, February 1 2011

The protectors of 10 Murray St are penning a second appeal after an amended plan for the controversial redevelopment was approved yesterday.

The Sullivans Cove Waterfront Authority gave the Citta Property Group’s $100 million Parliament Square amended development plan the tick.

However, the development hinges on the initial appeal filed by the project’s main opponents, Save 10 Murray St, which remains before the Resource Management Planning and Appeal Tribunal.

The Parliament Square redevelopment is intended to revitalise the block of government buildings between Parliament House and Davey St.

But it has prompted controversy because the plans include the demolition of several historically or architecturally significant buildings, including the 14-storey Murray St office tower and the former Government Printing Office in Salamanca Place.

Save 10 Murray spokesperson Briony Kidd said fighting two applications was draining, but the group would still fight vehemently.

“We will continue to object to the demolition of the iconic building 10 Murray St and the heritage-listed Government Printing building,” she said.

Miss Kidd said the group was expecting a decision from the planning tribunal within the next week.

Last plea to save offices

DAVID KILLICK   | The Mercury

January 19, 2011 12.01am

THE 43-year-old government office tower at 10 Murray St is part of a “threatened generation of city buildings” and should be saved from demolition, a planning tribunal has heard.

Final arguments in the appeal against Citta Property Group’s $100 million Parliament Square development were heard in the Resource Management Planning and Appeal Tribunal yesterday.

The main objector is the Save 10 Murray group which wants the building preserved because of its heritage significance and architectural qualities.

The Parliament Square redevelopment is intended to revitalise the block of government buildings between Parliament House and Davey St.

It has prompted controversy because the plans include the demolition of several historically or architecturally significant buildings including the 14-storey Murray St office tower and the former Government Printing Office in Salamanca Place.

Save 10 Murray’s lawyer Shaun McElwaine said two reports used to bolster the case for redevelopment were flawed.

“The evidence put forward in favour of demolition suffers a number of defects and should be rejected,” he said.

“The persons who say this building is of such low significance it should be knocked down did not study here, do not practise here and have not spent much time here.

“It is an important building in the Tasmanian context, although it is maligned by some.”

Mr McElwaine said 10 Murray St was one of just five surviving state office blocks built during the post-war boom.

“We’ve got a heritage watchdog with their eye off the ball. They swallowed the developer’s line,” he said.

A revised proposal for the site is being considered by the Sullivans Cove Waterfront Authority.

Building demolition appeal returns to tribunal

Posted January 18, 2011 14:43  (ABC Hobart website)

A group appealing against the demolition of the 10 Murry Street office block in Hobart has disputed a report saying the building has minimal heritage value.

The planning appeals tribunal is hearing objections to the Parliament Square development proposed for the precinct around Parliament House.

The development would involve demolition of the 1960’s office block.

The Save 10 Murray group says the report claiming there was minimal heritage significance was biased.

Lawyer Shaun McElwaine told the tribunal that consultant Jennifer Hill had written an earlier report, used by the developers, identifying 10 Murray Street and nearby buildings as having development potential.

He says the earlier report had only been made public when the Save 10 Murray group had appealed against the building’s demolition.

This article appears at:

http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2011/01/18/3115564.htm?site=hobart

The arts and musical festival MONA FOMA is underway currently in Hobart…

The venue for many of the events is the revamped Princes Wharf 1, with smaller acts appearing on a stage in the courtyard area.  It’s a position that is effectively backgrounded by 10 Murray Street, Tasmania’s iconic 1960s State Offices building.

My Tasmania

by Leo Scofield

The Mercury, Saturday Magazine 13 November 2010

EXCERPT:

It would be interesting to know just how many members the group known as Save 10 Murray St has. I am all for preserving important buildings of any period, but it seems to me that 10 Murray ranks about 99th on the list of top 100 threatened buildings in Tasmania. That it’s a rare example of a 1950s modernist building is unarguable. But whether it’s an important building is another matter.

Its fans claim that it’s the best Tasmanian example of an office high-rise of this period is like saying Auschwitz is the best example of a Polish concentration camp. It’s not a dog but it’s transcendently undistinguished.

And if, as the chairman of the Heritage Council says, more than two thousand buildings need assessing, there are more important sites to be considered.

Richard Francis Jones, the man in charge of replacing this over-hyped building with something classier, it one of the most highly regarded architects practising in Australia.

Continue Reading »

The contested hearing regarded the ‘Parliament Square’ development application (by Citta Property Group) began at the Resources Management and Planning Appeal Tribunal in Hobart on 6 October 2010 and witnesses gave evidence until 12 October.

The appeal hearing continued on 14 October with final submissions but was halted due to a point requiring clarification.  The hearing has been scheduled to resume on 22 and 23 November 2010.  For procedural queries contact the tribunal: http://www.rmpat.tas.gov.au/contact